Episode #686: Podcast for March 24, 2012 Shows

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Saturday, March 24, 2012, This is Hell! aired a live and completely uninterrupted and unedited four hour broadcast beginning at 9 AM (US central) on Chicago’s Sound Experiment WNUR 89.3 FM, streaming live and podcast shortly after here.

Your bitter blind broke gap-toothed radio show host Chuck Mertz interviewed …

  • Richard Wolff is Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Richard is currently a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School University, New York City. He also teaches classes regularly at the Brecht Forum in Manhattan. He’s the author of, “Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It,” and this year will release three books including, “Occupy the Economy: Challenging Capitalism,” with David Barsamian (City Lights Books), “Contending Economic Theories: Neoclassical, Keynesian, and Marxian,” with Stephen Resnick (MIT University Press), and “Democracy at Work” (Haymarket Books). He also hosts a weekly hour-long radio program, “Economic Update,” on New York’s WBAI, 99.5 FM. You can find Richard’s writing regularly at The Guardian, Truthout, and the Monthly Review.
  • Michael Klare is author of, “The Race For What’s Left: The global Scramble for the World’s Last Resources” (Metropolitan Books). Michael is a contributor to Current History, Foreign Affairs and the Los Angeles Times, defense correspondent for The Nation and director of the Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies at Hampshire College.
  • Ian Angus is the author of, “Too Many People?: Population, Immigration, and the Environmental Crisis” (Haymarket Press). Ian’s previous books include, “Canadian Bolsheviks and The Global Fight for Climate Justice” (Trafford Publishing). Angus is the founder and director of Socialist History Project. He is Coordinating Committee Member of Ecosocialist International Network and is a member of Canadian Dimension editorial collective. He is editor of Climate and Capitalism, an online journal focusing on capitalism, climate change, and the ecosocialist alternative. He is the editor of The Global Fight for Climate Justice.

This Saturday’s irregular correspondents were …

  • live from London, David “The Cynical Optimist” Skalinder returned – and said goodbye to the ‘Cynical Optimist’
  • live in-studio, John K. Wilson is the author of, “The Most Dangerous Man in America: Rush Limbaugh’s Assault on Reason.”
  • and Jeff Dorchen delivered a Moment of Truth live from Los Angeles.
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Episode #686: Podcast for March 24, 2012
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Comments

comments

  • Ray Olson

    My commiserations on your colonoscopy.  Mine was a piece o’ cake in comparison, but then I always react strongly to drugs and didn’t feel the procedure a-tall.  No flatulence afterwards, either, and nobody said I should expect it, even.  Of course, I had the thing done at a clinic that specializes in lower g-i stuff, not a hospital.  And I’m about 20 years older than you and perhaps a lot more relaxed–remember Perry Como’s great response to the guy who asked him why he was always so relaxed and casual, “I’m old, and I drink a lot.”

    Yours in reaction,

    Ray

    P.S.  Rush Limbaugh’s a liberal extremist, not a conservative at all.  He’s never seen a dollar he didn’t worship.

  • Jim Vail

    Aint just the russians throwing bananas at african soccer players, the french and other europeans have thrown plenty at matches.

  • Dickie Bundle

    where is the podcast?

  • Slammfrazer

    Podcast?

  • Billrose1

    Chuck, you have a great show, I listen to the entire podcast every week.  But someone on your staff is sabotaging your efforts. No podcast ??? WTF ???

  • Konker

    Last hour was clipped from the podcast

  • Dickie Bundle

    End of show is cut off…

  • Amy Goodman

     Go to the David Skalinder site. He always posts at about 3 p.m (Saturday) and the show is always in it’s entirety. You can’t count on “thunderball” at all. If I could post a link I would, but I’m not technically savoy much like “thunderballs”.

  • Amy Goodman

     http://davidskalinder.com/hell//
    He sets a timer to record the show and hasn’t missed one yet. I would bookmark the page as “thunderballs” can sometimes take up till midweek to post a podcast.  I use it every week.

  • Joseph Marsh

    Richard Wolff claims that during the Cold War it was difficult to critique capitalism lest one be accused of being, in essence, an apologist for communism –depending on the era, a red stooge, fellow traveler, fifth columnist, and the like. I should like to point out, that a substantive change arrived during the Reagan era, namely a shift in emphasis away from “capitalism” per se, to “the market. An explicit equivalence was made between “the market,” democracy, freedom, prosperity, and above all, love of country. Critics of “the market” have been branded traitors and, much more damaging, as sheer idiots blind to “the obvious” which, if they were too dense to see it, was made visible by the collapse of the Soviet Union and the “to rich rich is glorious” embrace of capitalism in China (but not the sharing of power by communists, most interestingly). This new rhetorical sleight of hand possessed the virtue of being free of the ideological contamination of the many shopworn, overused “-isms” of the 20th century. “The market” as a semantic construction inhered none of the active advocacy suggestive of “-ism,” with “the market” implicitly a neutral place occurring naturally and absent human interference, as with “the forest” or “the seaside,” or better yet, “God’s green earth,” “purple mountains’ majesty,” and “fruited plain.” “The market” also meshes as well with the extraordinarily widely held and deeply misunderstood “Wealth of Nations” economics trope of “the invisible hand,” which for umpteenth credulous Americans long on cliche and short on reading means The Hand of God as depicted by Michelangelo, but instead touching the lips of Ronald Reagan and then indicating the freeway exit to the nearest Wal-Mart. As such, “the market” dovetails perfectly with the fundamental American conceit, that the US is where individuals and society are works of nature no less than is a Sequoia, imperfectible Creatures of God, provided commie pinko fags don’t get in the way.